Winslow Homer The Fog Warning 1885, Dave Mallach's nautical report on fine yachts

Flash Alert: Price Reduction

Mahogany Rose, the esteemed Vicem 67 Flybridge currently in Charleston, has undergone a $350,000 price reduction, to $1,050,000. She is scheduled for a new paint job and re-covered exterior cushions, presenting an opportunity for a timely buyer to pick their own color scheme.

Galley Island

Pivoting TV

High Gloss Varnish

Bunk room

Upper Deck

The full listing can be seen here:

Mahogany Rose Yachtworld Listing

This is one of my patented “You snooze, you lose” deals. Please call me for the full story….

Big Wave Dave

Time and Tide…

I. The Magazine!

At least one of your holiday wishes has been granted! The Winter issue of The Fog Warning Digital Magazine has just been published on the Apple and Google App stores:

The winter issue contains 178 pages of cool articles and in-depth listings of featured yachts. You can subscribe to this free and engaging diversion here:

The Apple Store

or

The Android Store

Enjoy!

II. An Explorer’s Dream

The hottest sector in super yacht construction for the last five years has been heavy duty, go-anywhere explorer yachts. The reason is not hard to fathom – Explorer’s speak persuasively to the adventurer’s among us.  Big and long adventures  – the Antarctic, the Galapagos, the Norwegian fjords – these rugged and distant lands require yachts that can travel long distances safely, stay out for at least six weeks at a time (in environmentally friendly ways), yet make no compromises to luxury or comfort.

This video captures the romance of that kind of yacht, and that kind of exploration, better than any I have seen. She’s a Dutch-built steel explorer, not too different than my Amundsen 42M or Zeelander 164. You are going to watch this video more than once, so make yourself comfortable….

On your second viewing, if not your first, you probably caught at moment 2:10 one of my Dutch tender’s at work, the classically inspired Long Island Yacht 28!

Some 80+ Long Island Yachts have been built in the last eight years. Half a dozen serve as tenders to megayachts. I can’t think of a better endorsement. You can find the Yachtworld listing for this fine little yacht right here:

Long Island Yachts Runabout 28

Legend, the yacht in this video, is a converted commercial ship. My yachts, built expressly for this kind of voyage, are the Amundsen 42M:

And the Green-Class Zeelander 164:

I have quite a lot of fun information on these builds. Curious readers, dig out your flare gun!

III. “And te tide and te time…” 

As far as my research goes, those olde English words are the first recorded use, from the year 1225,  of the term we all know: “Time and tide wait for no man.” The full expression was:

“And te tide and te time þat tu iboren were, schal beon iblescet.”

It doesn’t exactly roll of the tongue. Anyone who’s read the original Chaucer can tell you that. But I do like the historical nature of it all.

Last week I made a quick trip down to Fajardo, Puerto Rico to sea trial a really special sailboat. Running back into the harbor, the wind at our backs, I was momentarily surprised to see all the yachts at anchor pointing sideways to the wind. That reminded me that moored boats follow whichever is stronger – wind or tide. Docking a boat, its a good thing to know which is going to effect you more.

Here’s a video that makes the point. I’m docking The Baron, my Vicem 72 listing in Newport, a few months before her current owner took title. It’s a pretty tight fit. Tight enough that if you turn up the volume on my son’s play by play, you’ll hear

“Doesn’t look good, I don’t think he’s gonna make it!” 

The tide was running from port to starboard, with a little more velocity than I anticipated (you’ll see it drift this 30 ton yacht a little closer to it’s neighbor than I would have liked). Here is where a good set of bow and stern thrusters really came into their own. I’ll note in advance, for the squeamish among us, that no people, animals or yachts were injured in the making of this movie:

The Baron is in Miami. If you are going to be at the Miami Boat Show next month, I would love to schedule an appointment with you:

The Baron!

IV. Robotics

I’ve been knee-deep all month in financials, analyzing comparative construction costs for yachts around the world. Globalization has made hardware and material costs virtually identical no matter where you go. Labor, of course, is the great variable. Lately, because of increasing labor costs in China, Turkey – with its newly devalued Lira – has become an extremely attractive place to build a quality yacht at a great price. Sooner or later, though, advances in robotic construction is going to narrow down these advantages wherever you choose to build.

If that sounds years away to you, it ain’t. Here’s an amazing video of how Grand Banks is using robots in Malaysia to make their production molds. The magic is scheduled nightly, when most of the staff is home with their families:

V. Zeelander 72, hull #1 Update

The Robb Report, and many other magazines you probably have lying around, has been covering the coming launch of our Z72 #1:

Zeelander Unveils Its Largest Yacht Yet

Hull #1 is on schedule to splash sometime between January 30th and February 14th.I’ll be in Rotterdam for her first sea trial, and I’d love to have you along for the ride.

Here are the latest construction pix:

Portside

Swim Platform (note the electric motor).

Starboard

The Belly of the Beast

Custom Tile Work

Ciao for now, loyal readers. And remember to subscribe to The Fog Warning Digital Magazine on the Apple and Google App stores.

Big Wave Dave

Not supposed to notice…

I. What you’re not supposed to notice…

To all whom I was lucky enough to catch up with at the Fort Lauderdale Show, thanks for your time! I can say with complete authority that no one who boarded our Zeelander 55 left unimpressed. And my clients, I am very proud to say,  are very hard to impress!

Seeing my yacht through your eyes is the most valuable education I could ask for. On the VIP day of the show, an experienced yachtsman I had met for the first time spent quite awhile going through her, as you can on VIP days. When he was done, he sat in the cockpit for a long time, drinking her in, before saying:

“I get it. She speaks to me.” 

That she did. That’s what happens when the right designer meets the right builder, and the magic begins.

The FLIBS show was perhaps my 150th over the last twenty years. I would guess I have shown my yachts to way more than 100,000 people in that time. And what these relationships have taught me is that with the finest of yachts – those created by that special magic – the first appeal is not what we we consciously see. It’s about what we feel.  Feelings like this couple evidenced in their spontaneous “flash-tango” on the Z55’s beautiful, immense swim platform:

That platform, by the way, operates my means of a cockpit switch mounted in the aft docking station”

As well as a handheld remote and a hidden emergency switch along the waterline reachable by a swimmer in case … well, you know.

The operation of the platform is a thing of beauty:

I’m sure you noticed at the beginning of that clip the port-side tender garage. It houses a Williams Jet Tender. It’s operation is shown here in this real-time video:

The Z55 was an eye-opener at the show. I have previously posted here a bunch of exterior photos and videos, but I now have some stupendous interior and cockpit shots:

The Master Cabin, with a TV lift in the makeup desk.

Mirror facing outward, TV facing the bed.

Stunning tile work in the master head.

VIP Cabin, forward.

Stunning woodwork, the equal of any I’ve seen coming out of Istanbul.

The Bar and TV area.

The TV, after dropping from the ceiling, of course rotates for viewing from the salon as well.

Salon table, with rotating captain’s chris for wrap-around eating for an honest eight guests.

The Salon table in its convertible bed position. Electrically operated, of course.

The cockpit table drops in the same way, making a huge sun bed:

And, ingeniously, the table also tips up 90 degrees, allowing a complete athwartship walkway, with cockpit entries to port and starboard!

I asked that yachtsman what our Zeelander whispered to him.  He said:

“She just …. flows.”

Flows! I was thrilled to hear that word. Because that ideal was determined up front by Zeelander. Their designers and builders challenged themselves to build a yacht with as few straight lines as possible. In the end she’s all about the curves, and they certainly do flow.  Take a moment and revisit the pix above, and this one below, and I think you’ll get my meaning. Flow is not something you expressly see. It’s not about noticing design and engineering choices. It’s something you feel. And when you do, it makes your day! And mine….

If you could not make it down to FLIBS, our Z55 is berthed in Fort Lauderdale for the next few months. She is fully available for your own special VIP viewing. Just launch a flare…

II. And Her Little Sisters

These intoxicating curves are no less evident with the “little” yachts that launched the Zeelander line: The Zeelander 44H. You will find her in motion here, and if you can find more than a handful of  straight lines, you win!

I can now announce two dramatic price reductions on two “leftover” Z44’s.  The first is a stunning 2014 model with a metallic Black Sable hull:

And the second is a Bentley Blue 2012 Dealer Demo at almost 40% off a new build price:

These two wonderful pocket yachts, currently at the factory in Holland, now need to go away. Quality trades will be considered. You can see their complete specifications on my Yachtworld listings, here:

Zeelander 44 #028 – Call for Price

Zeelander 44 #016- $795,000

By all means, call me for their stories in full. One of these belongs on your dock, and  if they won’t get you to Europe, nothing will.

III. The Holland Tour

I’ve been displaying, to no small notice, some wonderful photos of the Hartman Yachts Livingstone 24M on her Scandinavian cruise, Now, some from the Holland part of her shakedown:

So what then, you might ask, are we not supposed to notice about the Livingstone 24?

That’s easy – her rugged construction. It’s completely untrue, for those in the know,  to say that the blood and guts of yacht building in steel and aluminum is best left unexamined, like that old joke about the sausage factory. There is real beauty in strength, if you finish the job right! For an explorer yacht like the Livingstone 24, it’s about becoming the beast and the beauty, in that order.

You can build a myriad of rugged boats out of steel, from barges to aircraft carriers. But building them with consummate style and grace means enveloping their ruggedness with real polish and panache. That’s where the magic happens.  So here’s a glimpse of what you are not supposed to notice, in chronological order:

Tough enough for the Norwegian fjords.

Steel plating done.

The aluminum pilothouse.

Pilothouse attached. A welding job not for amateurs!

Finis!

Splash time.

Where it all comes together…

This wonderful go-anywhere classic is berthed about an hour outside of Amsterdam. She’s a full season yacht, of course. I’ll be in Holland on a monthly basis all winter, so please allow me to take you on your sea trial of this beastly beauty.

IV. And then there’s those tough conditions…

My final “not supposed to notice” for the week is about when fine yachts get tested in  harsh, real world conditions.  Because when the going gets tough, a great yacht delivers a ride capable enough that your family  don’t quite notice that tough sea-state.

The best example of this is The Baron, my Vicem 72 listing, effortless making her way through some serious weather at 28 knots, with nary a complaint:

She is in Miami, and can (make that should) be seen at any time.

VI. And finally…

Something I do want you to notice, loyal readers. I’d like to introduce you to my new hire. Now serving as The Fog Warning’s “Good Will Ambassador,” I am pleased to present Trout, my new Australian Shepherd puppy:

Her first performance review was OUTSTANDING! I will keep you posted as she chews through my life.

As always, thanks for rolling with me!

Big Wave Dave (and Trout)

All thoughts, feelings and opinions expressed in The Fog Warning are just that – My own personal can’t-fall-asleep-at-night ruminations. Some people lay awake and count sheep. For some of us,  it’s boats…